Crime Rate

Violent Crime Rate Increases 20% Since 2014

Crime impacts both real and perceived safety. It can also negatively affect investment in a community if a neighborhood is considered unsafe. This indicator tracks crime rate trends and juvenile arrests. The crime rate includes reported violent felonies (homicide, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault) and property felonies (burglary, motor vehicle theft, and larceny-theft).1

Crime impacts both real and perceived safety.

How is San Bernardino County Doing?

Crime Rate

San Bernardino County, 2014-2017
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Source: California Department of Justice, Open Justice Dataset, Crimes & Clearances (//openjustice.doj.ca.gov/); State of California, Department of Finance, E-2.

In 2017, the overall crime rate in San Bernardino County2 decreased:

  • The property crime rate decreased 6% between 2016 and 2017 and the violent crime rate decreased 3% during the same one-year period.
  • Because property crimes account for most crime, the overall crime rate decreased 6% between 2016 and 2017.
  • The crime rate in San Bernardino County is in the middle among neighboring counties compared and lower than the state.
  • Due in part to a change in crime categorization, San Bernardino County witnessed a 7% drop in the property crime rate since 2014, when California voters passed Proposition 47, which reduced some nonviolent, non-serious crimes to misdemeanors.

Crime Rate

County Comparison, 2017
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Source: California Department of Justice, Open Justice Dataset, Crimes & Clearances (//openjustice.doj.ca.gov/); State of California, Department of Finance, E-2.

Despite a one-year drop, San Bernardino County’s violent crime rate has increased since 2014:

  • Between 2014 and 2017, the violent crime rate increased 20%.
  • Specifically, since 2014, the rate of rape increased 74%,3 while the robbery rate increased 19%, aggravated assault rate increased 16%, and the homicide rate is up 14%.
  • Between 2016 and 2017, the number of homicide victims was largely unchanged, dropping by one from 129 to 128. However, this figure is higher than in 2014, when there were 110 homicides.

Victims of Homicide

San Bernardino County, 2008-2017
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Source: California Department of Justice, Open Justice Dataset, Crimes & Clearances (//openjustice.doj.ca.gov/); State of California, Department of Finance, E-2.

Violent Crime Rate, by Type (Rate per 100,000 Residents)

San Bernardino County, 2014-2017
2014201520162017Change from 2014
Rape22.529.432.839.174%
Robbery115.3135.2135.8137.819%
Aggravated assault249.3297.6313.8289.416%
Homicide5.25.165.914%

Juvenile arrests are down:

  • Mirroring a statewide trend, during the five-year period between 2013 and 2017, juvenile (youth under 18) arrests in San Bernardino County dropped 39%.
  • In 2017, 59% of the juvenile arrests were for misdemeanor charges.

Juvenile Arrests

San Bernardino County, 2008-2017
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San Bernardino County Probation Department Day Reporting and Reentry Services Centers

The San Bernardino County Probation Department operates three Day Reporting and Reentry Services Centers (DRRSC) that are regionally-based adult facilities. The centers are funded with a portion of the monies received from AB 109 and are conveniently located. DRRSCs provide access to co-located multi-agency partners: Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), Transitional Assistance Department (TAD), Public Health, and Workforce Development Department. Each center has a dedicated Probation Homeless Services Coordinator, a clothing closet, and offers life skills and reentry support classes. Classes offered include, but are not limited to, anger management, employment, healthy life choices, parenting, cognitive journaling, food handler’s training, and computer skills training.

During fiscal years 2015/16 to 2017/18, more than 20,700 clients were seen at the Probation Department’s three DRRSCs.

Of these clients:

  • 6,413 were referred to Workforce Development for employment readiness training or job placement assistance;
  • 3,999 were referred to TAD for assistance with accessing Cal-Fresh or health care enrollment;
  • 5,727 were referred to DBH for assistance with behavioral health issues, dual diagnosis issues and/or coordination of outpatient treatment services;
  • 1,260 were referred to Probation Housing Coordinators for housing assistance.
  • 439 were referred to Public Health for care coordination support, such as assistance with accessing prescriptions or a health care provider and receiving health education services.

Note: The figure 20,700 represents the total number of clients seen at DRRSC. Not all clients received a referral for services, thus the bullets do not add up to 20,700. Source: San Bernardino County Probation Department, Research Unit

1Only violent and property crimes (considered Part I crimes) are included in the crime rate for this indicator. Part II crimes (which include such crimes as embezzlement, forgery, disorderly conduct, and driving under the influence) are not included. By some estimates, Part II crimes account for about 60% of total crimes reported in San Bernardino County. 2Due to changes in methodology and sources, data in this indicator are not comparable with prior Community Indicator Reports. Crime rate data include all jurisdictions in San Bernardino County, including sheriff’s department, highway patrols, hospitals, school districts, and other large campuses. 3In 2015, the Department of Justice reporting requirements changed and several sex crimes that were previously reported as Part II crimes were recategorized to Part I crime. This accounts for some of the increase.